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Generational Play
liberty5300
 April 26 2024 at 09:37 pm
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“Play is the work of childhood.”-Piaget Elena Sokolova My dad came over the other morning to bring my daughter some gifts for her birthday. After enjoying an early lunch with my dad and his girlfriend, my daughter asked for some play-dough. These days, I have to actually hide it from her so that she won’t open every single container and mix it all together into one big blob. I was about to retrieve a few containers, but instead, I thought it might be fun to switch it up. “Slime?” “Yes, mommy! Slime!” I went to the cabinet and pulled out all of the ingredients. Sparkly glue, the slime “activator” liquid, beads of various colors and letters of the alphabet, and some sparkles. It’s not very difficult to make, and this is just one method of making it. I make slime quite often and I think it’s a fun little activity for us to do together. There’s something satisfying about it. However, it’s certainly short-lived. Once we make it, not much time passes before it ends up in the trash can, just like the play-dough. My dad seemed a bit shocked and confused when he observed us making the concoction together, my daughter standing on her stool at the kitchen counter as we mixed the ingredients with a spatula. He asked, “have you done this before? I laughed, “yes, a few times.” Once mixed, my daughter seemed to get bored, as usual. However, I was still perfecting it, kneading it as she moved on to her dollhouse in the living room. I knew that once it was done, she’d likely play with it for about ten minutes, and then it would either go into the trash, or get stuck to the rug and remain there until found. It takes half a bottle of cleaner to get slime out of any sort of carpeting. My dad and his girlfriend chuckled as they watched me work on the slime. “Do you like it? Or does she?” My dad teased. Soon enough, my dad and his girlfriend each grabbed a portion of the slime, and eventually, all of us, including my husband, were at the kitchen table playing with the slime. The only one of us lacking interest was my daughter on the floor with her dollhouse (lol). “You know what’s weird, Liberty? Your great great grandfather on your moms’ side invented some sort of glue.” “The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct.” – Carl Jung I had honestly forgotten about this. My Holocaust-survivor-scientist-great-great-grandfather used to say to my grandma when she was a little girl, “our ancestors live through us.” This made me smile. My grandma as a child. “This sort of thing is in your blood,” my dad joked. Maybe it’s a stretch, and more humorous than anything, but isn’t play a type of amateur experimentation? I sometimes like to imagine what my ancestors were like and what traits we may have shared. I kind of think it’s our duty to know a little bit about our family history, in addition to respecting our elders. There may be exceptions to this, but I think it’s usually wonderful. Looking back at pictures with my grandma has been an incredible bonding experience after she just returned home from rehab after a hip surgery. A few days after the slime day, my dad checked Thinkspot for the first time in a long time. “Wow! You’re so lucky! Everyone is so smart on this site!” He kept raving about the posts and various comments from people. I honestly wasn’t surprised by his reaction. My dad has always enjoyed writing, and some of his poetry was pretty good. Maybe writing and poetry, in addition to creating new things, is a form of play, too. We hear so much about “generational trauma.” What about “generational play?” (lol) “I wish I had my old writing and poetry to show you, this reminds me of what I used to write when I was your age,” my dad smiled. “I guess this sort of thing is in my blood,” I laughed.
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What Percentage of Women are "Marriageable ?"
DarrylN
 April 24 2024 at 09:00 pm
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Michael Knowles DEBATES Pearl Davis | "Men Should Bow Out" (youtube.com) Pearl says only 5% of women are worthwhile considering the risk, and her criteria is 'fatness, tattoos, non-traditional women', etc. I suppose that she may be taking into account the 1/3 or 1/4 of women who have had abortion as well. That could be a bottom line, for sure. What point is marriage, if there is no inherent respect for the child? 60% of marriage-age women who support abortion as a number one issue.Objectively, that could serve as a bottom line for a man to decide. It is useful for winnowing .Tattoos or blue hair one the other hand does not make a woman a eunuch. So far, Knowles is talking about traditional parishes as a counter argument. But what is that, 0.5percenters? She seems to be cleaning with the floor with him so far... His response is men suck too... He goes on to one "ought" to do. Ought one to marry someone is unmarriagable? So, if the point of marriage is to have children, or in Catholic terms, procreative and unitive, what is the percentage of women who are like that. On a similar question, the Seinfeld crew came up with, what, 15 percent even fuckable? When it comes to Pearl's criteria of fat, she is using the Seinfeld standard- the porno cam girl standard- as her criteria. Personally, my retirement plan is seeing women as tens all the way down, as far as hot potential goes, and as far as marriage potential, fat girls are capable of having babies just as easy as scrawny ones. Blue hair, tattoos, passionate is better whatever the costume, but that is not the criteria for marriage. The criteria for marriage, I think, is whether or not the girl has a passion to fill the world with your kids. The criteria for marriage is a desire that wells up in a woman to be a mother. What percentage of women, of marriagable age, want to be like that. That is what makes a woman marriagable. Anything less in the current political and social and legal environment, and it may well not be worth it for men, anything different, anything less To get pulled into the victim game of men or women's rights or men's rights, who suffers more, misses the point. But for a man to understand if a woman loves children like that, he must love them like that himself. Fathers values start well before marriage. It is not a percentage game in the end. It is a matter of knowing what to look for. And it is a matter of want, desire as deep as Abraham, wanting to fill the universe with out children. What percentage of women have that desire any more? But in terms of Abraham, all it took was one. Anything other is too two much. All any man needs is one. Oh, and of course happy wife happy life. we are joined together at the hearts. It is the nature of the species. But that is beside the point. It is not a question of happy. It is a question of a want deeper than just being happy. In a world of billions, all's it takes is one.
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Role Model
liberty5300
 April 24 2024 at 05:10 pm
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Last year, I taught a student who had a child a year or two older than my daughter. The two girls would sometimes giggle and smile at each other over zoom while we worked through practice questions. I truly enjoyed working with her. “They will pick up on everything, just you wait,” she stated a few times throughout our sessions. I wasn’t quite sure what she meant. My daughters’ language development wasn’t as advanced as it is now. She’s recently started to speak in full sentences. I do get it now. Young children are kind of a reflection of ourselves. We are their role models at this age, and this can be beautiful and simultaneously terrifying (lol). It all started with my husband. I guess, instead of referring to my husband by his first name, I frequently call him “babe.” I didn’t think this would impact my daughter until, at about two, she began publicly and confidently referring to my husband as “Dada baby.” I received a few weird looks from family and friends when she blurted this out. She’d even point to men at the gym and look at me for confirmation while asking, “Dada baby?” Most of them just chuckled, thankfully. The next phrase she acquired was “Shoo Fly,” part of the popular nursery rhyme. We’d often sing the song, but she unfortunately adopted this phrase publicly as well. If she didn’t want another kid to get on a play structure with her at the park, she’d scrunch up her nose and shout, “Shoo fly…babay!” Like most toddlers, she definitely has a spicy side. There are some acquired phrases that are more refreshing than others. We have the eternal optimist: “It’s not that bad.” I guess I say this quite a bit. She’s now saying this, too. We have extreme ownership: “My bad.” She says this, in addition to “Sowwy,” all of the time, even when it’s not warranted (lol). In contrast, people are always pleasantly surprised to hear her say things like, “it’s a nice day outside!” And my husband especially loves when she reacts with, “that’s amazing!” Or, “that’s wonderful!” Kids are so funny. Raising them must be the single most fulfilling part of life. It doesn’t come without its moments, however. The word, “role model,” can backfire a bit. A week ago, while cleaning up, I saw a large pool of water by the bath tub. I had just given my daughter a bubble bath and we are moving in less than two weeks. The last thing we need is an extra fee or two for a leak or floor issue. I guess I “spoke” a specific word too soon and I didn’t realize my daughter was still near me after drying her off. A few days later, I took a shower and I guess I left a few watery footprints next to the bath rug. My husband walked into the bedroom attached to our bathroom, and my daughter smiles and points at the footprints. She shouts at the top of her lungs, “Daddy look! F***!”
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The New Question Part 2
liberty5300
 May 11 2024 at 02:13 pm
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In part 1, I discuss a “question” that is somewhat unique to my native city, in addition to a weird way in which we use the word “hoosier” (lol). Indiana natives, please do not take offense :) So let’s start with the infamous question: “Where did you go to high school?” As I discussed, this question may be unique to the area, but it’s somewhat shallow and it’s not very helpful, at least, anymore. It is, however, still tempting to ask this when I meet someone new who is originally from the area. It’s probably pathological. Moving into a brand new neighborhood with a bunch of young families, I expected to frequently hear “the question,” at least, initially. I was shocked when I didn’t immediately hear it from any of my new neighbors. This time, I was actually the one to let it slip. It found its way to the tip of my tongue before I was even conscious of it. I tried to hold back as I shook hands with the couple across the street, but it was too late. I stutter and twitch as it forces itself out, leaving me guilty and blushing. I uncomfortably wait for their response. My neighbors begin to chuckle, respond, and then return the favor. What just happened? Did *I* stoop so low? Is the question finally obsolete, and now I’m the one idiotically bringing it up? Maybe “the question” is just for bars, restaurants, and networking events. Maybe it’s only for dance class, Mommy-and-me gymnastics, and soccer practice. I must have heard it there! Or maybe it’s just becoming irrelevant these days? I was partially right. The St. Louis question is still out there, but there’s a new question on deck, especially for young parents. The question for my age group has been revamped. The common denominator, the underlying trend of all of my conversations with parents of the two-through-four-year-olds in the new neighborhood leads me to one conclusion: There’s a new question, and I don’t have an answer to it, at least, not yet. What do I say? What if my choice doesn’t fit the mold? I feel like a grey SUV mom in a world of only white and black SUVs (See recent Tik Tok trend). In fact, that’s exactly what I am. To some, this question is quite telling. Based on my observations, there’s a whole point system involved, and your score better be high if you crave that sort of approval. +2 points: Any *relevant* response, since you’re quite obviously “socializing” your child, if that’s what it successfully achieves. +8 points: If your answer contains the word “Montessori.” +4 points: If your child attends three days per week. +10 points: If children learn Spanish or Chinese there. +20 points: If there’s a waitlist. +12 points: If you get a low-paying job there while your child is attending. -45 points: “I was thinking of doing it at home.” How could you be so arrogant? Do you want your kid socialized or what? I must be making it obvious! What is the *new* question? To be continued…

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